May the Saints & Feast Days for the month of April inspire you to grow closer to Christ Jesus. 

April 2: Good Friday of the Lord’s Passion 

“Since we have a great high priest who has passed through the heavens, Jesus, the Son of God, let us hold fast to our confession.For we do not have a high priest who is unable to sympathize with our weaknesses, but one who has similarly been tested in 

every way, yet without sin. So let us confidently approach the throne of grace to receive mercy and to find grace for timely help.” – Hebrews 4:14-16 

“Jesus said, “I thirst.” There was a vessel filled with common wine. So they put a sponge soaked in wine on a sprig of hyssop and put it up to his mouth. When Jesus had taken the wine, he said, “It is finished.” And bowing his head, he handed over the spirit.” – John 19:29-30 

April 4: Easter Sunday The Resurrection of the Lord 

“But the angel said to the women, “Do not be afraid; for I know that you seek Jesus who was crucified. He is not here; for HE HAS RISEN, as He said. Come, see the place where He lay. Then go quickly and tell His disciples that HE HAS RISEN from the dead.” – Matthew 28:5-7 

April 10: Divine Mercy Sunday 

In the to St.Faustina Kowalska, our Lord called for a special feast day to be celebrated on the Sunday after Easter. Today, that feast day is known as Divine Mercy Sunday, so named by Pope St. John Paul II at the canonization of St. Faustina on April 30, 2000. 

From St. Fautina’s Diary: Divine Mercy in my Soul, “My daughter, tell the whole world about My inconceivable mercy. I desire that the Feast of Mercy be a refuge and a shelter for all souls, and especially for poor sinners. It is My desire that it be solemnly celebrated on the first Sunday after Easter. On that day the very depths of My tender mercy are open. The soul that will go to Confession and receive Holy Communion shall obtain complete forgiveness of sins and punishment.”

April 29: St. Catherine of Siena (1347-1380) 

St. Catherine of Siena was canonized on June 29, 1461, and declared a Doctor of the Church by St. Pope Paul VI in October 1970. She is best known for her efforts to convince Pope Gregory XI to move the papacy from Avignon, France back to Rome. Pope Gregory returned his administration to Rome in January 1377. She is also known for her book on mystical theology, The Dialogue of Divine Providence, which is a dialogue between a soul who “rises up” to God and God himself. 

“We are of such value to God that He came to live among us … and to guide us home. He will go to any length to seek us, even to be lifted high upon the cross to draw us back to Himself. We can only respond by loving God for His love.” – St. Catherine of Siena 

April 30: St. Pope Pius V (1504-1572) 

Pope from 1566 to 1572, his main objective was the implementation of the decrees of the Council of Trent, which called for significant reforms to the Church. He published the Roman Catechism, revised Roman Breviary, and the Roman Missal; he also declared St. Thomas Aquinas a Doctor of the Church. In dealing with the threat of the Ottoman Turks, Pope Pius organized an alliance between Venice and Spain, which culminated in the Battle of Lepanto. This battle was a complete victory over the Turks. The day of the victory was declared the Feast Day of Our Lady of Victory, in recognition of Our Lady’s intervention in response to the rosaries that had been recited across Catholic Europe. 

“In union with the perfect confidence and hope that the Holy and Blessed Virgin placed in Thee, do I hope O Lord.” – St. Pope Pius V